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Road Force® Balancer Certification Course

This course is 2-days and includes a combination of the vibration theory, diagnostics and hands-on equipment certification using the Hunter Road Force balancer. Students will learn the fundamentals of vibration theory in addition to tire/wheel balance nomenclature and procedures. Road Force Variation measurement and correction will be discussed and demonstrated. Other topics will include tire pull diagnostics, bead massage procedure, tire diameter measurements and printouts.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

By the end of the course, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the following elements of vibration:
      -Source, transfer path and responder
      -Free and forced vibration
      -Harmonics and order of vibration
      -Point of resonance
  • Explain the diagnostic methods used to isolate the source of the vibration
  • Explain the tools available to isolate the source of the vibration
  • Explain and demonstrate the proper procedures used to mount a tire/wheel assembly to a balancer i.e. selection of cone, back coning method, front coning method, use of flange plate
  • Explain the difference between the static and dynamic balance procedure
  • Explain the difference between traditional balancer logic and SmartWeight logic
  • Demonstrate the ability to select correction weight position for clip weight and tape weight
  • Demonstrate and explain the process of performing a centering check
  • Demonstrate and explain the process of measuring and correcting Road Force Variation
  • Demonstrate and explain the process of measuring lateral force and assembly diameter
  • Demonstrate and explain the use of the "Plan View" for minimizing vibration or tire pull
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce and explain the summary printout

PREREQUISITES:

None. Previous automotive experience preferred.

TARGET AUDIENCE:

Vehicle Service Associates

COST:

$400 per student

COURSE LENGTH:

Two-days (16 hours), unless otherwise specified